All known Gale Rocks inputs [SPOILERS] – Roadwarden

All known Gale Rocks inputs [SPOILERS] – Roadwarden 1 - steamclue.com
All known Gale Rocks inputs [SPOILERS] – Roadwarden 1 - steamclue.com

Because I enjoy the game’s fill-in-the-blank sections, I made a list of all the word combinations you can use in Gale Rocks to get results.

THAT LEAD TO A COMPLEX INTERACTION

  • “aquila” or “bath” or “bathmaid” or “bathman” or “publicbath” or “riverbath” or “laundry” or “washman” or “washwoman” or “washmen” or “washwomen” or “cleanliness”:
  • “albus” or “salt” or “saltworker” or “saltworkers” or “saltmaker” or “headsaltmaker” or “saltminer” or “brine” or “saltproducer” or “saltproducer” or “lumpman” or “salttrader” or “saltdealer” or “saltpans” or “saltworks” or “saltern” or “salterer” or “salter” or “waller” or “wallers”:
  • “domitia” or “barrelmaker” or “barrel” or “barrels” or “cooper” or “carpenter” or “furnituremaker” or “barrelmakers” or “coopers” or “carpenters” or “furnituremakers” or “woodworks” or “woodworker” or “woodworkers”:
  • “smokery” or “smokehouse” or “smoke” or “saltery” or “fishdressing” or “dressing” or “dressingfish” or “fishprocessing” or “processingoffish” or “processingoffish” or “smoking” or “salting” or “smoker” or “smokers” or “fishsalter” or “fishsalters” or “saltfish” or “smokefish” or “smokedfish” or “fishforsale” or “barrelfish” or “barelledfish” or “fishbarrels”:
  • “photios” or “fisher” or “fishers” or “headfisher” or “fisherman” or “fishermen” or “fisherwoman” or “fisherwomen”:
  • “phoibe” or “pheibe” or “phoeibe” or “photiosgirl” or “photioslas” or “photiosdaughter” or “photiossgirl” or “photiosslas” or “photiossdaughter”:
  • “severina” or “headwoman” or “headman” or “savarina” or “saverina” or “head”: or “chief” or “mayor” or “chieftain” or “leader” or “master” or “boss”:
  • “navica” or “boat” or “boatmaker” or “boatwoman” or “boatgirl” or “naavica” or “naviica”
  • “porcia” or “fish” or “fishes” or “diner” or “dinner” or “food” or “granary” or “cook” or “headcook” or “meal” or “portia” or “rations” or “edibles” or “eats” or “kitchen” or “rations” or “foodrations” or “ration”:
  • “guard” or “gateguard” or “gate” or “guard” or “guards” or “defender” or “sentry”:
  • “tatius” or “weaponsmith” or “tacius” or “smith” or “armorer” or “armourer” or “axe” or “ax” or “weaponshop” or “weapon” or “weapons” or “equipment” or “shield” or “quarrel” or “quarrels” or “bolts” or “bolt”: # trainer
  • “rufina” or “tailor” or “sewer” or “outfitter” or “dressmaker” or “garment” or “garmentmaker” or “clothier” or “armormaker” or “armor” or “patching” or “armorfix”:
  • “fulvia” or “shelter” or “bed” or “room” or “vacancy” or “freeroom” or “freebed” or “rest” or “sleep”:
  • “petronius” or “gossiper” or “gossip” or “newsmonger” or “hurdler” or “busybody” or “tattletale” or “telltale” or “scandalmonger” or “gossipmonger” or “rumors” or “spy”:
  • “iuno” or “digger” or “juno” or “miner” or “tunnelexpert” or “navvy” or “builder” or “constructor” or “mason” or “stonemason” or “brickslayer” or “construction” or “constructionworker” or “constructionworkers” or “constructor” or “architect”:
  • “florus” or “arrowmaker” or “bowmaker” or “fletcher” or “bowstore” or “archer” or “arrow” or “arrows”:
  • “asterion” or “roadwarden” or “oldroadwarden” or “previousroadwarden”:
     
  • “bandits” or “bandit” or “highwaymen” or “highwayman” or “brigand” or “brigands” or “robber” or “thug” or “footpad” or “robbers” or “thugs” or “footpads”:
  • “glaucia” or “banditleader” or “banditchief”:
  • “glauciaparents” or “glauciafamily” or “glauciamother” or “glauciamom” or “glauciafather” or “glauciadad” or “vitaandvalerius” or “vitavalerius” or “glauciasibling” or “glauciasiblings” or “glauciasparents” or “glauciasfamily” or “glauciasmother” or “glauciasmom” or “glauciasfather” or “glauciasdad” or “vita” or “valerius” or “glauciassibling” or “glauciassiblings” or “glauciasancestors” or “glauciaancestors” or “glauciaforebear” or “glauciaforebears”:
  • “priest” or “priestesses” or “priestess” or “priests” or “church” or “temple” or “chapel” or “deity” or “thedeity” or “wright” or “thewright” or “prayer” or “meditation” or “monk” or “monks”:
  • “missinghunters” or “creekshunters” or “dalia” or “admon” or “vaschel”:
  • “singlepeople” or “singles” or “maid” or “maids” or “bachelor” or “bachelors” or “unmarriedpeople” or “unmarriedperson” or “singleperson” or “maiden” or “maidens” or “singlefolk” or “singlefolks” or “girlfriend” or “boyfriend” or “match” or “matchmaking” or “marriage” or “love” or “relationship” or “betrothed” or “husband” or “wife” or “marina” or “paulus”:
  • “cassia” or “casia” or “cassio” or “casio”:
  • “work” or “job” or “labor” or “employment” or “income” or “money” or “bones” or “dragons” or “dragonbones” or “dragon” or “bons” or “cash” or “gold” or “coins” or “coin”:

 

THAT LEAVE A VALUABLE HINT

“seafolk” or “seefolk” or “seafolks” or “oceanfolk” or “oceanfolks” or “seatribe” or “seapeople”:

‘You learn that the majority of the local seafolk work as fishers since they can hold their breath for longer than most of their neighbors. The locals have many skin tones, signs of dozens of families who moved to this area across the centuries, but you recognize the coastal blood in most of them – the wavy hair, long limbs, small ears, and almost complete lack of beards. Still, if they were just some of the many faces you would spot in the city square, you wouldn’t even notice these features.

“barn” or “animal” or “animals” or “stable” or “cattle” or “ibexes” or “sheep” or “livestock” or “pheasant” or “pheasants” or “feather” or “feathers” or “pen” or “animalpen” or “enclosure” or “animal keepers” or “ibex” or “ibexes” or “boar” or “boars” or “mouflon” or “mouflons”:

‘There’s only one animal pen in the entire village, and not a very large one. In front of the thatched shed you find a few ibexes, boars, and a large group of pheasants, whose pinioned or clipped wings make it impossible for them to cross the wall, though not the fence – some of them have already left the enclosure, and the locals let them wander about.[custom1]

“artisan” or “craftsman” or “craftsmen” or “artisans” or “craftsperson” or “wares”:

‘You learn that the locals craft mostly in winters, and only work on the things they need for themselves. The only year-long artisans are the carpenters and coopers, but even they produce almost exclusively barrels.

“alchemist” or “alchemy” or “alchemyset” or “potions” or “potion” or “potionseller” or “potionmaker” or “potionbrewer” or “alchemytools” or “alchemicaltools” or “brewingtools” or “alchemy”:

“She has her alchemical tools, necessary to brew ciders and distill hard drinks.”

‘Since the village has no forest garden and almost no foragers, there is no local tradition of potion making. You’re told to ask {color=#f6d6bd}Foggy{/color} about her own alchemy set, which she uses to brew ciders and distill hard drinks.

“inn” or “tavern” or “pub” or “roadhouse” or “hotel” or “motel”:

‘Your or an inn is futile, and the locals are quite proud that they have no place “to waste their days with mugs and dice.” They explain that if any caravan needs to stay the night, there’s always enough space to empty one of the caves. “If you need room to spend the night,” you’re told, “{color=#f6d6bd}Fulvia{/color} may have something.”

“prostitute” or “wh*re” or “sexworker” or “hooker” or “harlot” or “streetwalker” or “s*x” or “prostitution” or “f*ck” or “shag”:

if appearance >= 3:

‘There are no obvious people you could ask about such a service, as everyone seems busy with their tasks. You finally head toward a tidy woman standing by herself, and she looks at you with bewilderment. “Ehm, no soul here needs to do such things to earn their soup, and no one wants to. You’d faster find a betrothed here than a shag. We don’t sleep with newcomers. Who knows what illnesses they bring,” to illustrate her words, she points at your crotch.

“herbalist” or “herbalists” or “healer” or “medic” or “doctor” or “witchdoctor”:

“According to the people of {color=#f6d6bd}Gale Rocks{/color}: “He just listens to what we need, says his price, and makes us go, he does.””

‘You’ve learned that the locals can’t rely on the herbs that grow in the rocky hills and leas. “When we {i}have to{/i}, we seek help from {color=#f6d6bd}Thyrsus{/color}, the herbalist of {color=#f6d6bd}White Marshes{/color}. He cares for the peat fields.” You try to learn more about him, but everyone you ask admits to not knowing him all that well. “He just listens to what we need, says his price, and makes us go. He does.”

“necromancer” or “necromancers”:

‘The villagers react with distrustful scowls, but after just a few minutes you find an elder wearing a winged hourglass. When he hears your question, he fearfully grasps the pendant and speaks with closed eyes. “So you’re looking for them, road warden! May The Wright bless you!” He looks at you again, with a shadow of a smile on the corner of his lips. “Be brave, and crush them in {color=#f6d6bd}White Marshes{/color}, the village in the west, hidden among the wetlands like them saurians in the water!”

“monster” or “beast” or “threat” or “monsters” or “beasts” or “threats” or “danger” or “undead” or “skeletons” or “creature” or “creatures” or “harpy” or “harpies” or “awoken” or “emptyone” or “emptyones”:

‘You ask about any unusual creatures that may present a threat to the locals, and you learn that for a few good years now everything seems under control, aside from harpies. “They take no bait, no food. All the beasts do nothing but fly and seek weaklings to catch. We tried to tame them with fish, but they never learn, dumber than a bat they are.”

‘You ask about any new threats approaching the walls, but the wilderness has been quiet.

“woodcutter” or “woodcutters” or “lumberjack” or “lumberjacks” or “lumberer” or “lumberers”:

‘There’s quite a group of lumberjacks working in the village, more than ten people strong, but the woods are far away, and the coopers and carpenters take a good few days to process the entire supply. “In better years, we used to buy timber from other villages. Finding them on our own takes so much time it’s hardly worth the effort.”

‘You’re told to speak with a limping farmer in his sixties. Hearing your question, he spares you a grin. “That’s where I worked, right! And where I lost half of my foot,” he laughs briefly and hits his left boot with a hoe, but since it’s closed, it doesn’t reveal any wounds. “We spent a few springs and summers there, many years ago, but once the cats moved in during winter, we had to quit. It was a cute spot, with carpets of flowers, and so many frogs…”

“storageroom” or “trade” or “trader” or “traders” or “merchant” or “shopkeeper” or “dealer” or “buy” or “sell” or “buying” or “selling” or “buy” or “store” or “buy” or “storage”:

‘A young carrier chuckles. “And what would you buy? Without a wagon, and donkeys? We sell barrels of fish, sacks of salt. When a caravan comes, we empty a warehouse, then fill it up again with food.”

THAT DO NOTHING

“child” or “children” or “kid” or “kids” or “boy” or “girl” or “boys” or “girls” or “youngsters”

‘As far as you can tell, there’s more than a dozen kids playing in the village, almost all of them on the western bank, and a slightly smaller group of teenagers, working together with adults in the east. They don’t seem to struggle with hunger, and their rugged clothes are appropriate for the weather.

“elderly” or “elders” or “oldpeople” or “oldfolks” or “aging” or “oldish” or “aged”:

‘Wandering down the alleys you find about ten elders, most of them on the western bank, where they take care of the children – overseeing the ones who can play on their own, and carrying the infants with them. A few of them also help with other chores – cooking, cleaning, or embroidering.

“disabled” or “disabledpeople” or “handicappedpeople” or “sick” or “invalid” or “invalids” or “cripple” or “cripplepeople” or “impaired” or “wounded”:

‘You find a few people who struggle with wounded or weakened shells, yet spend their time outside, either laboring for the common good or avoiding boredom if they are too impaired.

“farmer” or “farmers” or “peasant” or “farmhand” or “farm” or “field” or “crops”:

‘You find humble gardens and vegetable fields in both halves of the village. The farmers explain that these plants are but a small addition to their regular meals – the village would struggle without trading fish for regular crops and flour.

“ferry” or “ferryboat” or “raft” or “rafter” or “rafters” or “raftsmen” or “raftsman”:

‘You ask at the gate if there’s an option to travel either downstream or upstream. You’re told that there’s little purpose in doing so – the river starts in the wilderness, runs through a few sharp waterfalls, and ends in the salty waters. “Right, it’s merely used for one thing. Helps the fishers move the barrels down to the beach and back, but it still takes a few strong muscles.”

“forager” or “foragers”:

‘It turns out that the foragers mostly spend their time assisting the lumberjacks. There isn’t much food in the hills – small critters, eggs, berries, and green leaves, but in the woods the situation isn’t much better.

“gardener” or “forestgarden” or “forestgardener” or “foodgardener” or “foodgarden”:

‘You’re told these rocky lands won’t support anything taller than a bush, or even a meadow. Aside from a few humble groves, which are best left to themselves, the village has no {i}forest garden{/i} at its disposal.

“guide” or “guides” or “escort” or “mercenary” or “fighter” or “archer” or “soldier” or “warrior” or “mercenaries” or “fighters” or “archers” or “soldiers” or “warriors”:

“According to the locals, “There’s no coin worth losing a neighbor.”’

‘You’re told that the guards offer no escort to travelers. “The roads went to ♥♥♥♥, they did,” tells one of them. “When we leave, we do so in numbers big enough to fight off a troll. There’s no coin worth losing a neighbor.”

“potter” or “potters”:

‘You’re told that the potters only work once every year or two when enough of the earthenware pots and cups break from use.

“bloodsorcerer” or “bloodmage” or “bloodmagic”:

‘Your questions are met with scowls and resentful remarks. “How can you even suggest such a thing?”

“brewer” or “alcohol” or “drink” or “alehouse” or “drug” or “drugs” or “canopy” or “pot” or “weed” or “hemp”:

‘“Once a year, we make something out of apples and cherries,” you hear from a farmer, “but when we drink anything brought here from the South, it’s a great hit to our coin chest. We’d rather buy hemp from {color=#f6d6bd}Old Págos{/color}, at least it won’t leak out of a cask or a pot.”

“worker” or “workers” or “adult” or “adults” or “laborer” or “laborers” or “person” or “persons” or “people” or “humans” or “shell” or “human” or “shells” or “soul” or “souls” or “bird” or “birds”:

‘You need to be more specific.

“carrier” or “carriers”:

‘Carrying heavy weights around is done mostly by the young people. They transport tools, buckets of water, baskets of meals and ingredients, wagons of firewood, and barrels of raw or dressed fish.

Easter Eggs

“nothing” or “none” or “something” or “anything” or “whatever” or ” ” or “” or “noone” or “nobody” or “nosoul”:

‘And you find no one.

“meaning” or “meaningoflife” or “purpose” or “happiness” or “god” or “bhaalspawn”:

‘Not the right place to look for it.

“wtf” or “sh*t” or “ni**er” or “ni**a” or “f*g”:

‘Grow up.

“pokemon”:

‘…no.

“panda” or “pandas”:

‘There are no pandas in this desolate realm.

Written by my ass

I hope you enjoy the All known Gale Rocks inputs [SPOILERS] – Roadwarden guide. This is all for now! If you have something to add to this guide or forget to add some information, please let us know via comment! We check each comment manually!


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